An Attempt At Clarifying The “Software Design” Vocabulary

The teaser

“Design” is an overloaded term that causes confusion in software development. It has at least three meanings: design as result (as in “the design of the application is easy to change”), design as process (as in “I designed it using Test driven development”) and design as aesthetics (as in “I love this design”).

A clear vocabulary is the sign of a mature profession. Therefore, as an effort to advance our profession, I propose fixing the confusion using a more precise set of terms. You’ll find a glossary at the end of this blog post.

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Three Problems For The Next Era of Software Craftsmanship

In 1900 David Hilbert challenged the best mathematical minds to solve 23 problems. This set of problems has influenced the mathematics of the next century, leading to surprising discoveries. Probably the most shocking discovery was that axiomatic systems have inherent limitations.

Today, a different set of very bright people face a new era. 7 years of Software Craftsmanship has led to changes in the world of software. I can travel almost anywhere in Europe and find a community connected to software craftsmanship. People from the community authored books and articles. We stay in touch all the time thanks to modern technology such as slack, twitter, facebook and meetup. Local communities and companies organize conferences. And a brave member of this community started a newsletter, trying to guide us through the news in the field. We share what we love and we love to share.

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What I’ve Learned From Publishing My First Book

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Source: https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/603762570890117120/L5AKX-6w.jpg

I had a wish starting from 5th grade: to publish a book. A wish finally fulfilled this year when my first book, “Usable Software Design” became available on leanpub.

But this is not a blog post about the book per se. It’s not even meant to convince you to buy it (although you should). It’s more about convincing you that you have to publish your own book. It’s fun, it helps you discover yourself, and you might make some money from it. Seriously, start today. And if you think that you can’t, or that you have nothing to say, or that it won’t make money, etc. then read on, because I’ve been there too.

Adapt to Your Constraints and Preferences

Creating anything is hard. But it’s not hard where you expect.

Contrary to what most people think, ideas are easy. Ideas are everywhere. Inspiration is everywhere. Ideas pass from mind to mind and adapt to the recipient’s personal experience all the time. More ideas combine into a new idea. Ideas are easy and cheap and don’t account for much. Execution is what makes ideas valuable.

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Future Internet: centralized or distributed?

I saw last evening the documentary “The Internet’s own boy”, about the life of Aaron Swartz. His life was very impressive, and it made me think more about the Internet and to its social value. That is still a work in progress, but I have some things to share.

I’ve struggled to understand the Internet for a very long time. This may sound very strange coming from a computer programmer, leading a team of people who develops web applications. So let me clarify: the technical part of the Internet is relatively easy to understand. There’s a lot of reading to do, and a lot of technicalities, but that’s the easy part.

The question I’ve struggled to answer is:

What is the core of the internet?

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