Future Internet: centralized or distributed?

I saw last evening the documentary “The Internet’s own boy”, about the life of Aaron Swartz. His life was very impressive, and it made me think more about the Internet and to its social value. That is still a work in progress, but I have some things to share.

I’ve struggled to understand the Internet for a very long time. This may sound very strange coming from a computer programmer, leading a team of people who develops web applications. So let me clarify: the technical part of the Internet is relatively easy to understand. There’s a lot of reading to do, and a lot of technicalities, but that’s the easy part.

The question I’ve struggled to answer is:

What is the core of the internet?

Continue reading “Future Internet: centralized or distributed?”

Grow Your Knowledge Processing Skills

The way the human brain works has interested to me ever since high school. It’s a fascinating topic, still linked to many mysteries and whose study will undoubtedly create astounding insights.

What seemed back then simply an intellectual interest has become much more than that. We’re living in the age of information that exposes us to more and more data, news and 140 characters blocks, instantly accessible through the internet. Knowing how the human brain works is important to navigate our world and our time, to make good decisions or at least to avoid common mistakes.

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What Is Really TDD?

Every once in a while, I have conversations with people about what really is TDD. Since I built a certain knowledge on the topic in time not only by using it but also by explaining it to others, I decided to write this article that details my definite view on what TDD is. I hope you’ll find it useful.

Short Version

This is a long article. If you’re in a hurry,  this is the 5 minutes version:

Continue reading “What Is Really TDD?”

Raising the Bar for Models in the Agile/Lean Community

setting-the-bar-highWe are just a few days after the amazing experience that was ALE 2013. I enjoyed being for three days in a large family of European Agile and Lean practitioners, and I learned a lot from the conference. I’ve seen many enthusiastic blog posts after the event, and I’m glad that it was so much learning happened.

But this blog post will not be another one praising the experience. Instead, it will be about this: we’ve done it, it was great, how can we make it awesome?

I haven’t yet gathered all my thoughts after the conference, but there is one that keeps following me. A few speakers presented models to the audience; Jurgen talked about the learning model, Vasco talked about a model without estimates and I talked about a model for incremental design. There were many others which I didn’t mention because I don’t remember them now.

Having models is excellent. It shows that agile and lean thinking is evolving and maturing. It’s the same thing that happened with our understanding of the Solar System and then of the Universe, or of the way the matter is structured. But I couldn’t shake the feeling that all these models (yes, including my own) lacked something. And that something is boundaries. Continue reading “Raising the Bar for Models in the Agile/Lean Community”